Control Arm Bushing

The Purpose of the Control Arm Bushing

The control arm bushing consists of an outer metal sleeve, a durable rubber bushing and an inner metal sleeve. It’s attached to the ends of the control arm as it’s supported to the frame of the vehicle. Without the bushing, the metal ends of the control arm would be mounted to the frame and cause metal-to-metal contact. This would cause major clunking as the suspension maneuvers over bumps and other deviations on the roads. The bushing acts as a hinged dampener to cushion the suspension and provide a more manageable and quiet ride. Most front-wheel drive cars that employ struts only use a lower control arm, but many trucks and SUVs have an upper and lower control arm.

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Control Arm

In automotive suspension, an automobile’s control arm or wishbone (aka. A-arm or A-frame) is a nearly flat and roughly triangular suspension member (or sub-frame), that pivots in two places. The base of the triangle attaches at the frame and pivots on a bushing. The narrow end attaches to the steering knuckle and pivots on a ball joint.

The upper control arm can clearly be seen at the top portion of the suspension components in the attached photo, where it is the silver part horizontally attached to the frame inside the red body portion and connecting to the steering knuckle near the side of the tire’s wheel rim. Note the roughly A-shaped design with the top of the A near the tire and the bottom two points connected to the frame inside the body’s space. In the photo, the A-shape is reinforced with a solid triangular plate near the top of the A.

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Clutch Automatic

Clutches in an automatic transmission control the activation of planetary gear sets. These are made up of several discs, alternating between metal and fiber inside of a metal container. When these clutches fail, the transmission cannot operate properly.

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Symptoms of a Broken Shaft Axle

There are several different signs that might pop up to indicate you’ve bent or broken an axle shaft. A slight wobbling in your shaft while driving is the most obvious, and will probably be the first major clue that there’s a problem. In addition, misalignment with brake pads, as well as various kinds of visible leakage may occur.

 

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Automatic Transmission

An automatic transmission (also called automatic gearbox) is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Most automatic transmissions have a defined set of gear ranges, often with a parking pawl feature that locks the output shaft of the transmission stroke face to keep the vehicle from rolling either forward or backward.

Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. Some machines with limited speed ranges or fixed engine speeds, such as some forklifts and lawn mowers, only use a torque converter to provide a variable gearing of the engine to the wheels.

 

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Alternator

It all starts with a few telltale problems: A dash light coming on for a brief moment, maybe dimmed headlights and a few flickering gauges. Perhaps there’s even an odd smell, or a growling sound coming from under the hood.

Is this a case of automotive possession? No. Most likely it’s one of many possible alternator problems, and without a little attention, this problem can cause car trouble ranging from slow starts all the way up to a dead car.

While an alternator is a relatively simple component containing only a few parts, it plays a critical role in any vehicle’s operation. Essentially it turns the mechanical energy of the engine’s rotating crank shaft into electricity through induction. Wires within the alternator cut through a magnetic field; this in turn induces electrical current. That current is used to power your car’s accessories, which can be anything from headlights to the electro-hydraulic lifts on a snow plow. The alternator also keeps the battery fully charged, providing the power it needs to start the car.

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Air Temperature Sensor

The intake air temperature sensor plays a vital role in a vehicle’s exhaust system. Essentially, this sensor is what regulates the temperature of any air coming into the vehicle. A car’s computer system will make adjustments based on what the air is like, as hot and cold air functions differently in a vehicle. If your sensor is working improperly, however, the computer will not get accurate readings and will make adjustments that could negatively impact the performance of your vehicle. This could also cause the “check engine” light to come on. –

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Clutch

A clutch is a mechanical device that provides for the transmission of power (and therefore usually motion) from one component (the driving member) to another (the driven member) when engaged, but can be disengaged.

Clutches are used whenever the transmission of power or motion must be controlled either in amount or over time (e.g., electric screwdrivers limit how much torque is transmitted through use of a clutch; clutches control whether automobiles transmit engine power to the wheels).

In the simplest application, clutches connect and disconnect two rotating shafts (drive shafts or line shafts). In these devices, one shaft is typically attached to a motor or other power unit (the driving member) while the other shaft (the driven member) provides output power for work. While typically the motions involved are rotary, linear clutches are also possible.

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Brake Rotors

Most drivers know that they need to perform a little routine maintenance to keep their vehicle in good, working condition. That may involve regularly changing the engine oil, maintaining proper tire pressure and occasionally monitoring the levels of each of the vehicle’s vital fluids. Some components and systems require a little more maintenance and others require a little less. In terms of your vehicle’s braking system, if you regularly check the fluid and change your brake pads, you have nothing to worry about, right?

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Air Flow Meter

An air flow meter is used in some automobiles to measure the quantity of air going into the internal combustion engine. All modern electronically controlled diesel engines use air flow meter,[citation needed] as it is the only possible means of determining the air intake for them. In the case of a petrol engine, the electronic control unit (ECU) then calculates how much fuel is needed to inject into the cylinder ports. In the diesel engine, the ECU meters the fuel through the injectors into the engines cylinders during the compression stroke.

The vane (flap) type air flow meters (Bosch L-Jetronic and early Motronic EFI systems or Hitachi) actually measure air volume, whereas the later “hot wire” and “hot film” air mass meters measure speed of air flow.

The flap type meter includes a spring which returns the internal flap to the initial position. Sometimes if the spring is tensioned too tight, it can cause restrict the incoming air and it would cause the intake air speed to increase when not opened fully.

Differential pressure is also used for air flow measurement purposes.

 

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